The bottom line, man
What to do with a day off of work when you live in Southern Wyoming: drive from Laramie, WY to Walden, CO, from Walden to Rocky Mountain National Park, and then make your way to Boulder, CO for French food before driving back to Laramie. 
Though a long day, it was a beautiful one. And Whit Griffin was with me (he drove, too!), which made it doubly awesome. At several junctures along our drive to the top of RMNP—some 12,000+ feet in the air—we talked about how it seemed as though we were on another planet. I mean, look at the height of the snow on top of the Rockies.  
Small pictures from top right to bottom left: land near Woods Landing-Jelm, WY; a windmill in Rand, CO; near the Grand Lake entrance to RMNP; the road to the Alpine Visitor Center at RMNP; and just a few of the peaks within the park. 
And that’s yours truly at the Continental Divide (sandals not pictured).

What to do with a day off of work when you live in Southern Wyoming: drive from Laramie, WY to Walden, CO, from Walden to Rocky Mountain National Park, and then make your way to Boulder, CO for French food before driving back to Laramie.
 

Though a long day, it was a beautiful one. And Whit Griffin was with me (he drove, too!), which made it doubly awesome. At several junctures along our drive to the top of RMNP—some 12,000+ feet in the air—we talked about how it seemed as though we were on another planet. I mean, look at the height of the snow on top of the Rockies. 
 

Small pictures from top right to bottom left: land near Woods Landing-Jelm, WY; a windmill in Rand, CO; near the Grand Lake entrance to RMNP; the road to the Alpine Visitor Center at RMNP; and just a few of the peaks within the park.
 

And that’s yours truly at the Continental Divide (sandals not pictured).

My sister’s starting a new photography project: Landlocked.
Click through to check it out!
landlockedphoto:

Based in northeast Wyoming, Landlocked is a new project dedicated to exploring contemporary photography in the American West and an opportunity to recognize the people who make it.
Although this is a big endeavor, both in terms of square miles and population, it’s a way to connect sprawling…

My sister’s starting a new photography project: Landlocked.

Click through to check it out!

landlockedphoto:

Based in northeast Wyoming, Landlocked is a new project dedicated to exploring contemporary photography in the American West and an opportunity to recognize the people who make it.

Although this is a big endeavor, both in terms of square miles and population, it’s a way to connect sprawling…

I feel somewhat safe in saying that Spring has made its way to Wyoming, and things are getting beautiful around here. 
On my drive back to Laramie from Gillette this weekend, hundreds of bison were grazing on the hills near the highway—a scene I’m still trying to articulate. 
Before that, I got to spend time with my favorite animal: Bailey, our beagle. That’s her being shy with me in my parents’ kitchen. 
And I found a picture of my mom, my sister (her legs), and me (left) that my dad took a long time ago on vacation in Canada. It’s now one of my favorite things. 
Oh, yeah: there are tulips on my mantel because why not.

I feel somewhat safe in saying that Spring has made its way to Wyoming, and things are getting beautiful around here.
 

On my drive back to Laramie from Gillette this weekend, hundreds of bison were grazing on the hills near the highway—a scene I’m still trying to articulate.
 

Before that, I got to spend time with my favorite animal: Bailey, our beagle. That’s her being shy with me in my parents’ kitchen.
 

And I found a picture of my mom, my sister (her legs), and me (left) that my dad took a long time ago on vacation in Canada. It’s now one of my favorite things.
 

Oh, yeah: there are tulips on my mantel because why not.

This voice, able to negotiate a range of octaves and encompass the acts of remembrance, anticipation, recognition, and repetition that occur in O’Hara’s songs, was making a picture. More than that, it was making a space for the singer’s words to not only allow the pain of impossibility that exists in separation, but also acknowledge great love. And I didn’t feel sung at; there’s no showmanship in O’Hara’s delivery. Her lilt is sometimes matter-of-fact, sometimes near breaking, other times strong and angry. It’s human and animal and real. I trust it.

From “Keeping You in Mind: On Mary Margaret O’Hara"
 

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I wrote an essay about one of my favorite singers for The Volta’s Music issuewhich is full of all sorts of gems.